Archive for Grace Mathews

List Making

I make lists all the time. What I need from the grocery store, who to invite to dinner for a friend’s birthday, the homework I need to do this weekend, my goals for my student organization’s charity auction—all of these things and more make it onto my lists.

Whether you are in high school or college, lists can be your friend, provided you have them at the ready, and work toward crossing things off. Lists are key to achieving college success and high school success. Here are some ways to keep a list:

 

  • Pocket/purse sized notebook
  • App on your smart phone
  • Scraps of paper you always have in your pocket
  • Sticky notes
  • Notes stored on your computer

Of course there are more ways to keep lists, but you get my drift. Now think what kinds of things you need to put on your list and get going! Make a list of colleges and universities you would like to get more information about, of goals for your summer internship, of things to add to your resume, or application deadlines.

Do you need help coming up with ideas for your list? Making College Count is a perfect place to start.  It is filled with great advice for college and can help you developing goals and good habits that will help you achieve college success.  With your list in hand, you are now organized and ready to tackle your tasks.

Advice for College Parents

So your child is going to college. Commence worry about everything from how to pay for it to will my child be able to adjust to the new environment and work load. Whether you went to college yourself or not, it is a new and different world out there, and chances are unless you are a college professor or have older children already in college, you don’t know what you or your child can expect. How in the world will you know what your student is going through and how to advise them when they call and ask for help?

Read more

Staying Healthy in College

Maybe you had a great exercise and healthy-eating habit in high school. Maybe you are looking to start a new, healthier lifestyle in college. Whatever your background, you can avoid the freshman 15 or even slim down while getting your education. Here are some tips for staying healthy in college.

 

  • Eat breakfast. Let’s face it. For most college students, getting up early enough to stop by the cafeteria for breakfast just isn’t going to happen. So many will just skip breakfast all together. This is a bad idea. It’s a fact that breakfast is important and can help your brain and body in many ways. So each night when at the dining hall for dinner, pick up a piece of fruit or fill a plastic baggie with cereal to munch on while on your way to class the next morning. It does not cost anything extra or take up any extra time in the morning. It’s the perfect solution, especially for students living on campus. Read more

The College Search Summer

High School graduations are in full swing.  Many of you probably have summer jobs, athletic camps or enrichment programs to participate in, which will keep you busy during the summer down time.  But whatever you do, don’t forget the college search!

Read more

Lifeguard or Law Clerk?

How should you spend your summer break?

There are many factors you’ll need to consider to make the right choice as to how to best utilize your precious summer months. A good decision is critical as it can become a major advantage when you start to interview for your “real job” during your senior year.

Making the assumption that you’re going to attempt to make a few bucks over the break, you should consider your financial need as well as possible work options related to your field of study. You’ll also want to look at each potential job’s rate of pay, schedule requirements, work environment, and the opportunity for future employment it may provide.

Two good rules of thumb are: Read more

Even the Worst Job Can Help With Success After College

What’s the worst possible job? Waiting tables in a smoky dive? Sweeping floors in a loud, dirty factory? Gutting hogs in a slaughterhouse? There are plenty of candidates for this dubious distinction.

Sad but true, summer jobs are notoriously rotten. Unless you’ve had the foresight and good fortune to line up a good paying summer job in your chosen field, you may be dreading the approaching summer job grind. But for many students, a summer job is a financial necessity, even if the job itself is less than perfect.

Like everything else in life, a summer job is what you make of it. You can get much more than a paycheck out of any job, even on the assembly line. Every job provides opportunities to exhibit how driven you are (Effort), how well you along with the customers and co-workers (Group Skills), and how you can solve problems with the initiative and innovative ideas (Entrepreneurship). These three Winning Characteristics are important attributes that future employers will seek and reward. Read more

College Success – The Interview Question

Preparing for Letters of Recommendation

Many graduate schools and jobs require letters of recommendation before they will seriously consider you as a candidate for admission, scholarships or employment. A great letter of recommendation can really make the difference. Conversely, a poor letter can also make a negative difference. So in order to get the best letter possible, you need to do a little work first.

Read more

Appealing to Tired Eyes

Here’s a college tip: If you have the chance to work for a professor during your academic career, go for it. Professors are a great source of knowledge, professional contacts, and career help.

And you’ll also learn a big lesson about test-taking. Read more

Graduate School is a Job

 

If you’re planning to go to grad school, you may get a chuckle at all your friends working so hard to prepare themselves for the job market. Fortunately, you don’t have to be bothered with such trivialities for many years – you’re going to grad school.

 

Well, guess what? Graduate school is a job.

 

While there are many obvious differences (especially financial) between taking a full-time job and attending grad school, the selection process is similar in many ways. It turns out that the same characteristics that would make you a desirable candidate for a job are valued by graduate programs as well.

 

If you are planning to apply to a graduate program, you may want to check out an application well before (like a couple years before) you actually apply. Although you might expect a master’s program in history to be most interested in your academic background, especially in history courses, you’ll see the program’s application also asks about your extracurricular and work experiences. And if an interview is required, the discussion will definitely go well beyond your grades.

 

Keep in mind that graduate programs are often very selective, so they can look not just for strong students, but strong students who are well-rounded and who will add to the character of the program in other ways. Many graduate programs involve teaching assistant responsibilities, favoring candidates who can demonstrate Leadership and Communication skills. And applied programs such as business schools accept very few students who have not worked for two or more years.

 

The bottom like is that whether you’re headed for the job market or on to more education, you will be evaluated against other talented candidates, and while an impressive GPA is a great qualification, it will rarely compensate for a lack of other activities or skills. Think of grad schools as a job, work on achieving college success and building your background accordingly, and you’ll greatly enhance your chances of being accepted.