Tag Archive for GPA

Appealing to Tired Eyes

Here’s a college tip: If you have the chance to work for a professor during your academic career, go for it. Professors are a great source of knowledge, professional contacts, and career help.

And you’ll also learn a big lesson about test-taking. Read more

Avoid the Dreaded Social Section

It’s not your fault, you’re only human. Humans are social creatures, naturally drawn to other humans for comfort, camaraderie, and amusement. So it’s only natural that you’re drawn to the social center of the library.

Every library has one. You know where it is. Everybody knows where it is, and that’s the problem. It’s the section of the library where you go to make sure you don’t miss anything. It’s the dreaded social section. Read more

A 4.0 Just Isn’t Enough

Wouldn’t life be great if you could just get a 4.0? You’d graduate with honors and find a long line of recruiters waiting to hire you for your dream job at a dream salary. A 4.0 is a ticket to Easy Street.

Or is it? Anyone who thinks that a 4.0 is enough to get a great job is in for a rude awakening in the interview process. Yes, academic achievement says a lot about intelligence, logic, effort, and organizational skills, all of which are attractive qualities. But recruiters are looking for much more. The best candidates for almost any job display broad range of “Winning Characteristics” including those above and Leadership, Entrepreneurship, Group Skills, and Communication skills. Candidates who have used their college years to build this critical skill set, in addition to getting good grades, have a significant advantage in the job market.

Even in more technical fields such as engineering, accounting, and architecture, employers look for well-rounded employees who can work well with clients and co-workers, take charge of complex projects and produce results. Let’s face it, you won’t see a job ad like this: “looking for a candidate who will sit quietly at a desk, take notes, and complete reading and written assignments, study alone, and correctly answer written questions every six weeks.”

Don’t miss the point here. Good grades are important in the job market. A consistent C student will have difficulty getting interviews while a 3.3 student with a 3.6 in his or her major will get quite a few. But once an interview starts, attention will quickly turn to extracurricular involvement, leadership, and work experiences. A 4.0 is a tremendous achievement, but slightly lower grades coupled with internship experience, a solid list of extracurricular activities and good communication skills will probably be more attractive to a manager with an important job opening.

So work hard to get good grades. But also put effort toward other activities and work experience to make the most of your college experience.

Get Up and Go for College Success

 

There are very few things in life in which the difference between success and failure comes down to simply showing up. Just “being there” doesn’t typically get it done.

 

College is one of the places where “showing up” can make the difference for achieving college success. The reason for this is that many students don’t make it to class on a consistent basis. Given that, you can actually gain a “competitive advantage” relative to most by consistently going to class – by just physically being there.

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Dazzle them with Brilliance

Sure you’re smart. But can you prove it?

 

“Judgment Day” is coming – the day when you sit across the interview table from a potential employer. You’ll have 30 minutes or so to make a favorable impression on the interviewer, an impression strong enough to lead to additional interviews or even a job offer. Let’s face it, it’s a big deal.

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Get Inside Your Professor’s Head

How do you get something you want from a family member or friend? Whether you realize it or not, you use what you know about that person’s interests, values, and motivation. You make a deal with your parents by offering something you know they value. You get your roommate to drive you to class by promising to help her with an assignment she’s been dreading. When you understand what makes someone tick, you’re much more likely to get what you want from that person. It’s not manipulation, just a great survival skill.

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Making Finals Week a Competitive Advantage

Two weeks a year. They can be the difference between success and failure in college.

Twice a year, for one week at the end of each semester, you have to opportunity to make a dramatic impact on your G.P.A. Unfortunately, all too often, the “impact” is in the wrong direction and an entire semester of hard work suddenly seems like a tremendous waste of time. Read more

Finals: Gain a Major Advantage

A fundamental problem with finals week is volume – so many exams, so little time. You know the program. And while fairly simple time management techniques can help alleviate the finals crunch, it’s important to set priorities as well. If you want to achieve college success what should be your priority number one? Classes in your major. Read more

Participation Makes the Difference

Of course, showing up to class is one of the most important college tips that you can receive, but making college count is much more than just being present in class. Some classes in college have a participation component. The professor might encourage feedback from students during class. You may have to discuss the reading you had to do for homework, or participate in a class policy discussion. Take a closer look at your syllabus. Chances are there is a breakdown of the grading in the class and part of it (especially for smaller classes) is a participation component. This component of grading is no joke. It can take you from a B to an A or, from a B to a C, depending on whether you participate or not. Because of this importance, class participation is key to college survival. Read more